Elevator Pitchin'

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An elevator pitch is a brief description of your business and your products/ services, and is typically used when networking face to face or when pitching your company for a grant, a competition or to donors. An elevator pitch is one of simplest yet most powerful tools you have as a small business owner. This pitch is where you sell yourself, your ideas, and your future successes.

A typical elevator pitch is around 30 seconds. However, there have also been times where our elevator pitch has been as long as 3 minutes. Make sure the timing is exactly as instructed in pitch/ competition guidelines or is appropriate for the scenario. For example, if you are truly in an elevator-sum it up. Only say the most important elements and say them fast. If you have more time, still stick to the most important facts but elaborate with colorful details. People’s time is valuable, including yours. Be succinct, passionate, and on time.

Crucial elements to include: Who are you? What do you do? Why do you do it? How do you do it/ how are you going to do it?

The most important step is to clearly explain who you are and what you do.

We are a female founded 501(c)(3) nonprofit that teaches women in impoverished communities a trade skill, and then employs these artisans to craft a signature line of clothing and accessories. Our first workshop was launched in Tamale, Ghana, as a result of my co-founder growing up alongside these women and seeing first-hand the need for assistance. We expanded to India, as we recognized a pattern – in areas of extreme poverty there are talented women and beautiful materials, but no outlet or opportunity to participate in the global marketplace. 

Establish who will buy what you’re selling.

Our target market is US based female consumers aged 24-40.

Clearly define why you are unique.

By Grace was founded on the idea that enterprise, not aid, is the way to lift women from generational poverty. Billions of dollars of aid hasn’t, doesn't and won’t fix the problem of poverty, only enterprise can do that. It’s the age old proverb- you can give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day, or teach a man to fish and he’ll eat for a lifetime. 

If you have more time, expand on what you have succeeded in doing.

In both campuses we provide a tailor training program, along with a safe and healthy work environment. Our business model emphasizes the empowerment of women, ultimately giving them the necessary tools to elevate both themselves and their families out of generational poverty. By using affordable skilled labor in these countries, we’re able to command an average 67 percent profit margin on our collection. These products command higher margins than comparable goods because 75 percent of women aged 24-40 are willing to pay more for goods produced in sustainable and ethical ways. We are giving the American consumers the opportunity to engage and to make a difference through the simple purchase of a skirt or a handbag. With our low operating costs and high profit margins, we are able to re-invest 74 percent of our profits back into our campuses in Ghana and India, daily combating poverty through education and employment.

Share what you are going to do next.

Within the next 18 months, we are opening a third campus on Rosebud Native American Reservation in South Dakota, and are on track to employ 16 women in Tamale and 92 in Bangalore.

Open strong, finish stronger.

We decided to open with:

By Grace was built on the idea that enterprise, not aid, is the key to uplifting women out of generational poverty.

(It tells a bit of our story, while presenting an idea that is both revolutionary and somewhat common sense. Plus we reveal our heart and our overall goal.)

And we closed with:

When you partner with By Grace, you invest in the dreams of our 8 women in Tamale and 80 women in Bangalore. Change the world with us, one closet at a time.

(We invite people to join us, we present a couple of numbers of our success, and we leave with a bit of our brand identity.)

When you put the pitch together, make sure there is a flow. Make sure every word you’ve written is one you know how to pronounce and are comfortable saying in a conversational, yet passionate tone. Try not to write in too many statistics. They can be boring, overwhelming or both for those to whom you are pitching.

Practice your elevator pitch. Time it. Practice again. Your pitch should be memorized. This is your company. This is your brand. If you don’t seem to know what you are talking about or are in any way uncomfortable, your audience is going to have an issue buying into what you’re saying.

Our elevator is not perfect, and every time I have the opportunity to say it out loud I do. I pitch to strangers, I pitch to my friends; my poor mother has heard about a million versions of our elevator pitches, but each time I do it, I become more comfortable and believe in what we’re doing just a little bit more.

Until next time,

Kelsey

 

By Grace’s Current Elevator Pitch

By Grace was founded on the idea that enterprise, not aid, is the way to lift women from generational poverty. We are a female founded 501(c)(3) nonprofit that teaches women in impoverished communities a trade skill, and then employs these artisans to craft a signature line of clothing and accessories. 

Our first workshop was launched in Tamale, Ghana, as a result of my co-founder growing up alongside these women and seeing first-hand the need for assistance.

We expanded to India, as we recognized a pattern – in areas of extreme poverty there are talented women and beautiful materials, but no outlet or opportunity to participate in the global marketplace. 

By Grace is that solution. Billions of dollars of aid hasn’t, doesn't and won’t fix the problem of poverty, only enterprise can do that. It’s the age old proverb- you can give a man a fish and he’ll eat for a day, or teach a man to fish and he’ll eat for a lifetime. 

In both campuses we provide a tailor training program, along with a safe and healthy work environment. Our business model emphasizes the empowerment of women, ultimately giving them the necessary tools to elevate both themselves and their families out of generational poverty.

By using affordable skilled labor in these countries, we’re able to command an average 67 percent profit margin on our collection. These products command higher margins than comparable goods because 75 percent of women aged 24-40 are willing to pay more for goods produced in sustainable and ethical ways. We are giving the American consumers the opportunity to engage and to make a difference through the simple purchase of a skirt or a handbag. With our low operating costs and high profit margins, we are able to re-invest 74 percent of our profits back into our campuses in Ghana and India, daily combating poverty through education and employment.

When you partner with By Grace, you invest in the dreams of our 8 women in Tamale and 80 women in Bangalore. Change the world with us, one closet at a time.